Sometimes we should just not compromise.

Gentle Reader, this opinion piece was written by my dear friend, Jim Remmert, one of the best and most knowledgeable Libertarians I know.

“Lately, there has been a lot of media criticism about the need for and absence of “compromise” between our elected officials in Washington. One political consultant, Douglas Schoen, has even written a book, the title of which (“Hopelessly Divided”) accurately describes the ideological gap that exists between our elected representatives in Washington, and the frustration of the electorate with them.

However, many of these officeholders told their constituents that, if elected, they would work for economic freedom, individual liberty, lower taxes and government fiscal responsibility. Is it reasonable to expect that these people would compromise with other politicians who promised their constituents that they would work to expand government, and increase taxes? In short, where is the compromise between politicians who promise freedom with individual responsibility and those who promise government benefits and controls in exchange for reelection and expanded government power? These two opposing views of government are diametrically opposed and cannot be reconciled.

We voters created this mess that is driving our country toward the brink of financial and social chaos. Only we can return our country to a functioning representative democracy by giving our elected representatives an unequivocal message in November. The candidates can clarify the choices that are available to us. But between now and then we voters must reach a clear consensus whether the country will go forward as a society of government-dependent or free people. Make up your mind voters and don’t blame politicians for being who they said they would be.”

This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Sometimes we should just not compromise.

  1. r c mount says:

    The Green party platform addresses the concerns of this author very well:
    http://www.gp.org/committees/platform/2010/index….

    I’ve found little I disagree with in it. It addresses all of the Libertarian viewpoints and far more in a thoughtful, constitutionally appreciative manner. It’s time for a third party. Libertarians don’t quite make the grade for the lack of banking reform in their platform.

    A vote for the Dems or Reps is a wasted vote. They are the same party.

    Recently, the Green Party in Germany was the group that shut down the entire nuclear industry in Germany after the Fukushima catastrophe began. In the past, they stopped the hydroelectric industry from flooding environmentally critical valleys in Australia with unnecessary dam construction. Their platform says they want to shut down the corrupt aspects of the banking industry that runs our country. Maybe it’s possible. With a vote for Dems or Reps we will never know. Vote Green.

    • ween1 says:

      "A vote for the Dems or Reps is a wasted vote. They are the same party"

      I am so glad someone else realizes this. Sometimes I think I'm the last person in the world who believes this. The only differences between the parties are those things which should not even be a part of the picture. Yet these are the things that seem to polarize us the most. Personally I think that's exactly what the IMF/CFR want: the constituents arguing about condoms and gay marriage while secretly we eek closer and closer to globalization and the new world order.

  2. coloradobiz says:

    Ralph, thank you for this message. I've written a new fictional book about a populist rebellion in the USA in 2019 called The Boulder Boys, the Beginning – Vol I. The book is set in Boulder, CO and much of the theme regards the chaotic conflict existing in this nation because of not just two separate political perspectives but three, the global corporates, the elite leftists, and the masses in the middle. Thus the eventual collapse of the country. Much of the story centers around a man living in Boulder in the 60s, 70s, and the present and his evolution to becoming the new "John Brown" of the 21st century.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>